Mistakes were made: Motor Trend cops to flawed 2020 Chevrolet Corvette dyno pull

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November 12, 2019 03:00 PM

Mistakes were made: Motor Trend cops to flawed 2020 Chevrolet Corvette dyno pull

The C8 Corvette’s LT2 probably makes close to the rated 495 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque, MT finds.

Wesley Wren

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Steven Pham

Meet the new, midengine Chevrolet Corvette. Powered by a 6.2-liter LT2 V8 that’s mounted behind the passenger compartment, the new Corvette is a major shift in Corvette history. 

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Steven Pham

Gone is the familiar, long-nose Corvette styling. The shift to the rear mid-engine has radically changed the Corvette’s appearance.

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The new, rear styling is a departure from the last few generations of Corvette, with the design team venturing away from the center-exit exhaust. 

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Even though the new Corvette is mid-engine, it looks like the obvious evolution from the C7 ‘Vette.

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The heavily sculpted bodywork falls away when looking at the car’s silhouette. 

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The rear-midengine layout has been on the Corvette’s radar for nearly as long as the Corvette has been in production. 

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The huge side intakes help feed the 6.2-liter LT2 V8, as well as provide cooling to the radiators and other heat exchangers. 

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The new Corvette will also feature a nose lift: that’s a Corvette first.

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As different as it might look, the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette still has its roots settled deep in Corvette lore.

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The eighth-generation Corvette body panels are still composite, which shouldn’t be too big of a shock.

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The new Corvette is actually longer than the C7 it’s replacing. The midengine ‘Vette is 4.4-inches longer than the front-midengine C7 models.

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Steven Pham

Meet the new, midengine Chevrolet Corvette. Powered by a 6.2-liter LT2 V8 that’s mounted behind the passenger compartment, the new Corvette is a major shift in Corvette history. 

Toggle Fullscreen

Share

Steven Pham

Meet the new, midengine Chevrolet Corvette. Powered by a 6.2-liter LT2 V8 that’s mounted behind the passenger compartment, the new Corvette is a major shift in Corvette history. 

Toggle Fullscreen

Share

Steven Pham

Meet the new, midengine Chevrolet Corvette. Powered by a 6.2-liter LT2 V8 that’s mounted behind the passenger compartment, the new Corvette is a major shift in Corvette history. 

Toggle Fullscreen

Share

Steven Pham

Meet the new, midengine Chevrolet Corvette. Powered by a 6.2-liter LT2 V8 that’s mounted behind the passenger compartment, the new Corvette is a major shift in Corvette history. 

Toggle Fullscreen

Share

Steven Pham

Meet the new, midengine Chevrolet Corvette. Powered by a 6.2-liter LT2 V8 that’s mounted behind the passenger compartment, the new Corvette is a major shift in Corvette history. 

Toggle Fullscreen

Share

Steven Pham

Meet the new, midengine Chevrolet Corvette. Powered by a 6.2-liter LT2 V8 that’s mounted behind the passenger compartment, the new Corvette is a major shift in Corvette history. 

Toggle Fullscreen

Share

Steven Pham

Meet the new, midengine Chevrolet Corvette. Powered by a 6.2-liter LT2 V8 that’s mounted behind the passenger compartment, the new Corvette is a major shift in Corvette history. 

Remember those unbelievable horsepower claims made by Motor Trend? Well, they’re unbelievable for a reason. Apparently, in the rush to get the car on the dynamometer, some figures were incorrectly estimated and some settings were incorrectly set ahead of the dyno pull. While these goofs would likely lead to inaccurate results by themselves, they combined to make the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette look considerably more powerful than the team at Chevrolet officially reported.
Two major goofs in the dyno cell lead to such incredible numbers: The chassis dyno was set for an all-wheel-drive vehicle, which means the dyno assumes that the powertrain is sending power to four wheels and reports accordingly. The team also input the incorrect “road-load horsepower at 50 mph.” According to Motor Trend, the figure wasn’t released at the time of the dyno testing and there wasn’t enough time to find this figure before the car went on its way.

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Looking to figure out what happened, Motor Trend grabbed another 2020 Chevrolet Corvette, a Vbox and a sheet of paper to log some numbers. Instead of running this ‘Vette on another dyno, the team found a relatively flat section of a racetrack to do acceleration pulls. According to data collected, and the math to adjust for drivetrain loss, the Corvette is apparently close to the numbers Chevrolet officially released.
If you want to do this test yourself, you’ll have to wait. The hotly anticipated next-generation Corvette was delayed because of the recently resolved UAW strike. When you do take your new ‘Vette to the chassis dyno, just make sure to input all the correct numbers.
Hey, we all make mistakes, right? You can read about Motor Trend’s goof in detail here. You can also find out more about the LT2 powering the 2020 ‘Vette here.

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Source:https://autoweek.com/article/car-news/mistakes-were-made-motor-trend-cops-flawed-2020-chevrolet-corvette-dyno-pull

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